QBits
FIFA Women’s World Cup sparks Canadian call for equal play

 

Hall of Famer Carrie Serwetnyk wants equal funding for women’s soccer

As Vancouver prepares to host its share of next year’s FIFA Women’s World Cup games, the first female inductee into the Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame wants to harness the occasion to challenge the sport’s gender inequalities.

Carrie Serwetnyk, who is openly gay, says girls and women now constitute 47 percent of registered soccer players in Canada, yet receive less than 10 percent of the funding.

Women also account for less than one percent of paid decision-makers on national and provincial soccer boards, and are nearly invisible as professional coaches in Canada, she says.

“It seems like all the money, all the funding is back into the men’s game. It’s not right,” says Serwetnyk, who in 2014 founded the non-profit organization Equal Play FC to bring awareness to the gender gaps in Canadian soccer.

“My hope is that we can create new equity policy where girls and women’s sport gets 50 percent of funding across the country,” she says.

“We are constantly hearing the message ‘you’re important, but not important enough,’” she continues. “It hurts people. It affects them.”

Despite the gender imbalance, Serwetnyk says women’s soccer is gaining momentum both in Canada and abroad.

Not surprisingly, she credits US soccer player Brandi Chastain with one of soccer’s most defining moments for women when, in 1999, she kicked the winning goal in a FIFA World Cup final match, whipped off her shirt, and was photographed, muscular body fully flexed, in triumphant victory.

“It was one of those moments where everyone could remember where they were,” Serwetnyk says. “It shifted things. It was a celebration for women, but it was also a shifting for the minds of men.”

Today, she says, Canada’s national team “is full of women’s role models that we can dream about,” she says.

She is particularly impressed with openly gay soccer players like Erin McLeod, whom she respects as a “great goalkeeper” and an “amazing role model,” both as a player and as a person. “She must send such a ripple of hope for many female athletes who might live in fear of their sexuality.”

It was a different era, Serwetnyk says, when she played on Canada’s national women’s team from 1986–96. Back then, being openly lesbian could have cost her sponsorships, she says, and maybe even her spot on the team. It was “almost the worst word you could use,” she says, describing the word ‘lesbian’ as a weapon.

“Now it is 2014, it’s different, but in my time period, I definitely had that fear.”

These days, McLeod describes a “very liberal and accepting environment” on the women’s national team. She is out to the team and, in December, told Xtra that coach John Herdman is supportive. “It really helps that there’s an understanding with your coach. Even if he’s addressing the group, he’ll refer to ‘spending our time off with girlfriends or boyfriends’ instead of just assuming we all have boyfriends. It’s a safe zone,” she says.

McLeod says she understands that not all athletes feel as comfortable as she does being open, but she hopes enough athletes will continue to share their stories and lead by example.

“I’m not necessarily screaming from the top of buildings that I’m gay and this and that [but] with everything I do I try to be a role model for young girls in my sport,” she says. “Part of my problem growing up I didn’t know anyone who was gay, or any gay athletes.”

With Canada’s FIFA Women’s World Cup just a year away, Serwetnyk is determined to shine a spotlight both on the women who so ably play the game, and on the more equitable treatment she believes they deserve.

“We can use the World Cup to create legacy changes,” she says. “They’re expecting 1.5 million people to buy tickets. Let’s make it more than just a soccer tournament. It can be bigger than that!”

naturallybent:

mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) chillin’ on the neighbour’s apricot tree.

And they oo and they coo ever so lovely each morning and night.

naturallybent:

mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) chillin’ on the neighbour’s apricot tree.

And they oo and they coo ever so lovely each morning and night.

Gay basketball player Derrick Gordon: I cried most nights before I came out

Derrick Gordon said that being in the closet was hard for him

Derrick Gordon said that being in the closet was hard for him

Gay basketball player Derrick Gordon has said that being in the closet took a huge toll on him, and that he cried most nights before he came out.

The University of Massachusetts player became the first ever first division men’s basketball player to come out last week, and said he was inspired by gay NBA player Jason Collins.

He told SiriusXM Progress yesterday: “I was going back and forth debating whether I wanted to come out or not.

“I cried most of the nights when I was in the closet, because it starts to take a toll on you… just because you’re worried about how people are going to think about you and what they’re going to say about you.

“When you come out, it changes a lot of things you would have never expected.

“I thought, if I’m going to be the first one to do it, then I’m going to be the first one to do it, and be the leader of it, and help people out in other ways so they can live life the way I’m living it.

“As long as my family accepted me, it didn’t really matter what others thought of me.

“I never would have ever thought in my life that I would have talked to the people who got in contact with me lately.”

Gordon also urged other gay sports-people to go public, and said the time was right for more people to come out.

He said: “Don’t wait until you’re 35, 40 years old and you’re done playing the sport that you love, because it’s stressful to live that way.”

“Take advantage of everything that you have in front of you, don’t wait because you’re scared about somebody knowing who you really are.”

Birthday Surprise | สุขสันต์วันเกิด (by TestBKK)

This moment would be every young man’s nightmare growing up.

Whether you’re single, in a new relationship, part of a couple or enjoying the company of many, whether you like to suck or prefer to fuck, we all need to take care of our sexual health and wellbeing.

At TestBKK, we’re here to tell you more about the process of getting tested, ensuring you have the information you need to make the choices that are right for you and the people you play with.

For more information visit www.testbkk.org

naturallybent:

saveplanetearth:

Federal Court Allows Non-Profit Groups to Defend Kaua’i County on Behalf of Taxpayers @ Earth Justice

:)  kaua’i, sigh-i.

naturallybent:

saveplanetearth:

Federal Court Allows Non-Profit Groups to Defend Kaua’i County on Behalf of Taxpayers @ Earth Justice

:)  kaua’i, sigh-i.

huffingtonpost:

U.S. going greener in the 420 sense

huffingtonpost:

U.S. going greener in the 420 sense

cartoonpolitics:

"Going to church on Sunday does not make you a Christian any more than going into a garage makes you an automobile" ~ (attributed to evangelist ‘Billy’ Sunday and, in varying forms, to others)

cartoonpolitics:

"Going to church on Sunday does not make you a Christian any more than going into a garage makes you an automobile" ~ (attributed to evangelist ‘Billy’ Sunday and, in varying forms, to others)

Raising awareness about cat welfare is a good look for your husband’s upcoming campaign strategy. Don’t you think supporting government action on missing and murdered indigenous women in this country would be a better look?
Hailey King, the 21yo university student who interrupted Laureen Harper (wife of Canadian PM Harper) during her opening speech announcing her “Just for Cats: Internet Cat Video Festival” last night. Laureen responded, “We’re raising money for animals tonight. If you’d like to donate to animals, we’d love to take your money…That’s a great cause, perhaps another night. Tonight we’re here for homeless cats!” [source] (via randomactsofchaos)

youngblackandvegan:

biodiverseed:

craftjunkie:

Plantable Felt Garden {Tutorial}

Found at: abeautifulmess

——

BiodiverSeed.com/tagged/DIY

i need this for my future veggie babies :)

Um, why not provide a pot with real soil and a few seeds? A pot of basil or a pepper plant could be easily grown indoors near a well lit window…

1492: These Indians are barbarians, they wear no clothes.
2012: These Muslims are barbarians, they wear too many clothes.
fastcodesign:

Feast Your Eyes On These Infinitely Looping Flipbooks
Every kid loves a flipbook. It’s magic, at first sight, the way flipbooks bring sketches to life one frame at a time. But, horribly, flipbooks might also represent one of the first of many disappointments in a kid’s life: Pages run out, the animation stops dead.
Now, artist Juan Fontanive has discovered the equivalent of flipbook immortality, or maybe the fountain of flipbook youth.
Read More>

mesmerizing

fastcodesign:

Feast Your Eyes On These Infinitely Looping Flipbooks

Every kid loves a flipbook. It’s magic, at first sight, the way flipbooks bring sketches to life one frame at a time. But, horribly, flipbooks might also represent one of the first of many disappointments in a kid’s life: Pages run out, the animation stops dead.

Now, artist Juan Fontanive has discovered the equivalent of flipbook immortality, or maybe the fountain of flipbook youth.

Read More>

mesmerizing

dendroica:

A family of Little Owls on a branch in Kiryat Gat, Israel. Picture: ILIA SHALAMAEV/HOTSPOT (via Pictures of the day: 8 April 2014 - Telegraph)

dendroica:

A family of Little Owls on a branch in Kiryat Gat, Israel. Picture: ILIA SHALAMAEV/HOTSPOT (via Pictures of the day: 8 April 2014 - Telegraph)

neurosciencestuff:

Our Brains are Hardwired for Language
People blog, they don’t lbog, and they schmooze, not mshooze. But why is this? Why are human languages so constrained? Can such restrictions unveil the basis of the uniquely human capacity for language?
A groundbreaking study published in PLOS ONE by Prof. Iris Berent of Northeastern University and researchers at Harvard Medical School shows the brains of individual speakers are sensitive to language universals. Syllables that are frequent across languages are recognized more readily than infrequent syllables. Simply put, this study shows that language universals are hardwired in the human brain.
LANGUAGE UNIVERSALS
Language universals have been the subject of intense research, but their basis remains elusive. Indeed, the similarities between human languages could result from a host of reasons that are tangential to the language system itself. Syllables like lbog, for instance, might be rare due to sheer historical forces, or because they are just harder to hear and articulate. A more interesting possibility, however, is that these facts could stem from the biology of the language system. Could the unpopularity of lbogs result from universal linguistic principles that are active in every human brain?
THE EXPERIMENT
To address this question, Dr. Berent and her colleagues examined the response of human brains to distinct syllable types—either ones that are frequent across languages (e.g., blif, bnif), or infrequent (e.g., bdif, lbif). In the experiment, participants heard one auditory stimulus at a time (e.g., lbif), and were then asked to determine whether the stimulus includes one syllable or two while their brain was simultaneously imaged.
Results showed the syllables that were infrequent and ill-formed, as determined by their linguistic structure, were harder for people to process. Remarkably, a similar pattern emerged in participants’ brain responses: worse-formed syllables (e.g., lbif) exerted different demands on the brain than syllables that are well-formed (e.g., blif).
UNIVERSALLY HARDWIRED BRAINS
The localization of these patterns in the brain further sheds light on their origin. If the difficulty in processing syllables like lbif were solely due to unfamiliarity, failure in their acoustic processing, and articulation, then such syllables are expected to only exact cost on regions of the brain associated with memory for familiar words, audition, and motor control. In contrast, if the dislike of lbif reflects its linguistic structure, then the syllable hierarchy is expected to engage traditional language areas in the brain.
While syllables like lbif did, in fact, tax auditory brain areas, they exerted no measurable costs with respect to either articulation or lexical processing. Instead, it was Broca’s area—a primary language center of the brain—that was sensitive to the syllable hierarchy.
These results show for the first time that the brains of individual speakers are sensitive to language universals: the brain responds differently to syllables that are frequent across languages (e.g., bnif) relative to syllables that are infrequent (e.g., lbif). This is a remarkable finding given that participants (English speakers) have never encountered most of those syllables before, and it shows that language universals are encoded in human brains.
The fact that the brain activity engaged Broca’s area—a traditional language area—suggests that this brain response might be due to a linguistic principle. This result opens up the possibility that human brains share common linguistic restrictions on the sound pattern of language.
FURTHER EVIDENCE
This proposal is further supported by a second study that recently appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, also co-authored by Dr. Berent. This study shows that, like their adult counterparts, newborns are sensitive to the universal syllable hierarchy.
The findings from newborns are particularly striking because they have little to no experience with any such syllable. Together, these results demonstrate that the sound patterns of human language reflect shared linguistic constraints that are hardwired in the human brain already at birth.

I haven’t comprehended all of this post yet, but reblogging for my anth linguists whom I know will take offence at the reductionist science which doesn’t acknowledge culture plays an equally active role in language development.

neurosciencestuff:

Our Brains are Hardwired for Language

People blog, they don’t lbog, and they schmooze, not mshooze. But why is this? Why are human languages so constrained? Can such restrictions unveil the basis of the uniquely human capacity for language?

A groundbreaking study published in PLOS ONE by Prof. Iris Berent of Northeastern University and researchers at Harvard Medical School shows the brains of individual speakers are sensitive to language universals. Syllables that are frequent across languages are recognized more readily than infrequent syllables. Simply put, this study shows that language universals are hardwired in the human brain.

LANGUAGE UNIVERSALS

Language universals have been the subject of intense research, but their basis remains elusive. Indeed, the similarities between human languages could result from a host of reasons that are tangential to the language system itself. Syllables like lbog, for instance, might be rare due to sheer historical forces, or because they are just harder to hear and articulate. A more interesting possibility, however, is that these facts could stem from the biology of the language system. Could the unpopularity of lbogs result from universal linguistic principles that are active in every human brain?

THE EXPERIMENT

To address this question, Dr. Berent and her colleagues examined the response of human brains to distinct syllable types—either ones that are frequent across languages (e.g., blif, bnif), or infrequent (e.g., bdif, lbif). In the experiment, participants heard one auditory stimulus at a time (e.g., lbif), and were then asked to determine whether the stimulus includes one syllable or two while their brain was simultaneously imaged.

Results showed the syllables that were infrequent and ill-formed, as determined by their linguistic structure, were harder for people to process. Remarkably, a similar pattern emerged in participants’ brain responses: worse-formed syllables (e.g., lbif) exerted different demands on the brain than syllables that are well-formed (e.g., blif).

UNIVERSALLY HARDWIRED BRAINS

The localization of these patterns in the brain further sheds light on their origin. If the difficulty in processing syllables like lbif were solely due to unfamiliarity, failure in their acoustic processing, and articulation, then such syllables are expected to only exact cost on regions of the brain associated with memory for familiar words, audition, and motor control. In contrast, if the dislike of lbif reflects its linguistic structure, then the syllable hierarchy is expected to engage traditional language areas in the brain.

While syllables like lbif did, in fact, tax auditory brain areas, they exerted no measurable costs with respect to either articulation or lexical processing. Instead, it was Broca’s area—a primary language center of the brain—that was sensitive to the syllable hierarchy.

These results show for the first time that the brains of individual speakers are sensitive to language universals: the brain responds differently to syllables that are frequent across languages (e.g., bnif) relative to syllables that are infrequent (e.g., lbif). This is a remarkable finding given that participants (English speakers) have never encountered most of those syllables before, and it shows that language universals are encoded in human brains.

The fact that the brain activity engaged Broca’s area—a traditional language area—suggests that this brain response might be due to a linguistic principle. This result opens up the possibility that human brains share common linguistic restrictions on the sound pattern of language.

FURTHER EVIDENCE

This proposal is further supported by a second study that recently appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, also co-authored by Dr. Berent. This study shows that, like their adult counterparts, newborns are sensitive to the universal syllable hierarchy.

The findings from newborns are particularly striking because they have little to no experience with any such syllable. Together, these results demonstrate that the sound patterns of human language reflect shared linguistic constraints that are hardwired in the human brain already at birth.

I haven’t comprehended all of this post yet, but reblogging for my anth linguists whom I know will take offence at the reductionist science which doesn’t acknowledge culture plays an equally active role in language development.

holygoddamnshitballs:

White Supremacist
By Nick Anderson

holygoddamnshitballs:

White Supremacist

By Nick Anderson