QBits

"Religious authorities in the Malaysian state of Negeri Sembilan raided a wedding June 8, detaining 16 transgender women and one minor for violating a 1992 sharia law that prohibits them from expressing their gender identity.

The 16 women were fined 950 ringgits (about $324 Canadian) and sentenced to a week in jail but face the prospect of serving six months in prison if they fail to pay the fines, while the minor has been ordered to undergo a year’s counselling with the Negeri Sembilan Islamic Religious Affairs Department, Malaysia Today reports. Justice for Sisters, a campaign that advocates for the mak nyah (male-to-female transsexual) community, has initiated a fundraising drive to help the women pay the fines, even as a lawyer is attempting to get the women’s sentences reduced.”

Read more at the source link.

Interior Minister Margrethe Vestager said: “Today we have dropped the requirement of sterilisation when transgendered people need a new personal identification number as part of a legal sex change.

“It will make life easier and more dignified for the individual, for example when you are asked for ID in shops.

The government added it was part of an international trend towards “easing the conditions for legal sex change(s).”

Thousands of B.C. lawyers have voted for a non-binding resolution to reverse the B.C. Law Society’s April decision to accredit Trinity Western University’s new Christian law school, which has been criticized for its stance against same-sex relationships.

The resolution directs the board of governors, known as Benchers, to deny law society accreditation to TWU’s law school.

Of the B.C. Law Society’s 13,000 members, 3,210 voted in favour and 968 were opposed. However, the resolution is not binding, so does not automatically reverse the decision to accredit the law school.

"The decision regarding whether to admit graduates from the proposed law school at TWU is a Bencher decision," said president Jan Lindsay.

"However, the Benchers will give the result of today’s [Tuesday’s] members’ meeting serious and thoughtful consideration."

Read more at the source link.

(via Boy, 11, takes down Australia PM in stunning letter supporting gay marriage | Gay Star News)

‘My name is Orlando Burcham, I am 11 years old and I would like to know why you don’t allow ‘gay marriage’ in Australia

'Because the majority of Australians are happily married, so why are you stopping all the gay men/women to be married in this beautiful country?

‘My mother is gay and even worse your own sister is gay! And thousands more are as well.

‘You have actually met my mum Councillor Cordelia Troy who is a member of the Liberal Party and she was deputy major at the time.

‘It is so pathetic that you aren’t letting the gay people of Australia and other countries get married here.

'Millions of people in the world and when they come to Australia and think “wow this place is great! Let’s get married here!”

‘And then they remember that they can’t. So they spend thousands of dollars to go somewhere they can get married. My mum is married but she had to go to New York, which took a lot of money.

‘You were elected to represent our country, not yourself.

‘Just because you think it’s wrong, does not give you the right to make it illegal.

‘Doesn’t our opinions matter to you? Just because you’re the Prime Minister, which by the way does not give you all the power.

‘I hope you change your mind.’

Read more at the soure link.

(via Boy, 11, takes down Australia PM in stunning letter supporting gay marriage | Gay Star News)

‘My name is Orlando Burcham, I am 11 years old and I would like to know why you don’t allow ‘gay marriage’ in Australia

'Because the majority of Australians are happily married, so why are you stopping all the gay men/women to be married in this beautiful country?

‘My mother is gay and even worse your own sister is gay! And thousands more are as well.

‘You have actually met my mum Councillor Cordelia Troy who is a member of the Liberal Party and she was deputy major at the time.

‘It is so pathetic that you aren’t letting the gay people of Australia and other countries get married here.

'Millions of people in the world and when they come to Australia and think “wow this place is great! Let’s get married here!”

‘And then they remember that they can’t. So they spend thousands of dollars to go somewhere they can get married. My mum is married but she had to go to New York, which took a lot of money.

‘You were elected to represent our country, not yourself.

‘Just because you think it’s wrong, does not give you the right to make it illegal.

‘Doesn’t our opinions matter to you? Just because you’re the Prime Minister, which by the way does not give you all the power.

‘I hope you change your mind.’

Read more at the soure link.

Youths reveal what’s really happening to LGBTIs in Caribbean
Barbados: In response to an appeal from the local LGBTI group B-GLAD, Prime Minister Stuart declared he will remain dedicated to lobbying, both regionally and internationally against discrimination against any Barbadian citizen, including LGBTIs.
Yet Donnya Piggott from B-GLAD says: ‘The laws still discriminate and sometimes the police do not take attacks or threats against LGBT people seriously. The situation causes great physical, emotional and psychological damage.’
Trinidad and Tobago: Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bisessar said in 2012 she wants the National Gender Policy to ‘forge the way forward for Trinidad and Tobago as my government seeks to put an end to all discrimination based on gender or sexual orientation’.
Rian Merrick of the Silver Lining Foundation said: ‘Despite the PM’s words young LGBT persons and LGBT advocates were compelled to argue before a National Constitutional Reform Commission that their recognition under the law should not need to be up for discussion.
‘The priority is to find ways in which discrimination and prejudice can be reduced.’
St Lucia: Same sex intimacy can be punished by up to 10 years in jail. Christian fundamentalists continue to fight every effort to change attitudes and the law.
Jassica St Rose from United and Strong in St Lucia said she believed change was driven by the actions of youth who by their very nature are revolutionary, always challenging norms and values.
Jamaica: Often described as one of the most homophobic nations in the world. The summit saw footage of LGBTI youths forced to live in drains under the city.
Jae Nelson of the Jamaica Youth Network said: ‘Young people are visibly defiant to status quo – a kind of way being that says there is only one way of being; that some of us are more equal than others and that those who are LGBT do not belong in our society.
‘Many young people are doing this by just embracing their lesbian and gay friends, being open about their sexuality and declaring they believe in equal rights and justice for all.’
Belize: Caleb Orozco, who is challenging the discriminatory laws in his country was unable to attend the summit. In a speech read on his behalf he reported LGBTI youths had been physically attacked and faced mockery, ridicule and a denial of their rights to free expression.
He said: ‘The struggle of the Caribbean LGBT youth is a struggle of invisibility, quiet resistance and passive protest that has its foundation in the need to protect individual expression and dignity.’
Guyana: The conference heard testimony from Ceara Roopchand of Caribbean American Domestic Violence Awareness (CADVA).
She said same sex couples and transgender people were able to enjoy the freedom to socialize in some parts of Georgetown and other areas, but abuse and harassment were still common, including from police officers.
Click on the source link to read the full article.

Youths reveal what’s really happening to LGBTIs in Caribbean

Barbados: In response to an appeal from the local LGBTI group B-GLAD, Prime Minister Stuart declared he will remain dedicated to lobbying, both regionally and internationally against discrimination against any Barbadian citizen, including LGBTIs.

Yet Donnya Piggott from B-GLAD says: ‘The laws still discriminate and sometimes the police do not take attacks or threats against LGBT people seriously. The situation causes great physical, emotional and psychological damage.’

Trinidad and Tobago: Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bisessar said in 2012 she wants the National Gender Policy to ‘forge the way forward for Trinidad and Tobago as my government seeks to put an end to all discrimination based on gender or sexual orientation’.

Rian Merrick of the Silver Lining Foundation said: ‘Despite the PM’s words young LGBT persons and LGBT advocates were compelled to argue before a National Constitutional Reform Commission that their recognition under the law should not need to be up for discussion.

‘The priority is to find ways in which discrimination and prejudice can be reduced.’

St Lucia: Same sex intimacy can be punished by up to 10 years in jail. Christian fundamentalists continue to fight every effort to change attitudes and the law.

Jassica St Rose from United and Strong in St Lucia said she believed change was driven by the actions of youth who by their very nature are revolutionary, always challenging norms and values.

Jamaica: Often described as one of the most homophobic nations in the world. The summit saw footage of LGBTI youths forced to live in drains under the city.

Jae Nelson of the Jamaica Youth Network said: ‘Young people are visibly defiant to status quo – a kind of way being that says there is only one way of being; that some of us are more equal than others and that those who are LGBT do not belong in our society.

‘Many young people are doing this by just embracing their lesbian and gay friends, being open about their sexuality and declaring they believe in equal rights and justice for all.’

Belize: Caleb Orozco, who is challenging the discriminatory laws in his country was unable to attend the summit. In a speech read on his behalf he reported LGBTI youths had been physically attacked and faced mockery, ridicule and a denial of their rights to free expression.

He said: ‘The struggle of the Caribbean LGBT youth is a struggle of invisibility, quiet resistance and passive protest that has its foundation in the need to protect individual expression and dignity.’

Guyana: The conference heard testimony from Ceara Roopchand of Caribbean American Domestic Violence Awareness (CADVA).

She said same sex couples and transgender people were able to enjoy the freedom to socialize in some parts of Georgetown and other areas, but abuse and harassment were still common, including from police officers.

Click on the source link to read the full article.

(via A first for Puerto Rico as lesbian lawyer is nominated for a seat in Supreme Court | Gay Star News)

"A lesbian lawyer has become the first openly gay person to be nominated for a seat in Puerto Rico’s Supreme Court.

Maite Oronoz Rodriguez made history as Governor of Puerto Rico Alejandro Garcia Padilla made the nomination on 4 June.

At the press conference after her nomination, she thanked her partner.

‘Thank you for your unconditional support through the hardest of times, and through the best of times, like today… I wouldn’t be here without you,’ she said about her partner Gina Mendez Miro.”

Read more at the source link.

(via A first for Puerto Rico as lesbian lawyer is nominated for a seat in Supreme Court | Gay Star News)

"A lesbian lawyer has become the first openly gay person to be nominated for a seat in Puerto Rico’s Supreme Court.

Maite Oronoz Rodriguez made history as Governor of Puerto Rico Alejandro Garcia Padilla made the nomination on 4 June.

At the press conference after her nomination, she thanked her partner.

‘Thank you for your unconditional support through the hardest of times, and through the best of times, like today… I wouldn’t be here without you,’ she said about her partner Gina Mendez Miro.”

Read more at the source link.

In Jamaica’s case, we refer to Section 28 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms, which defines marriage as a union between one man and one woman, thereby ruling out the possibility of formal recognition of same-sex relationships. It is a provision that has its foundation in a deep-seated, if slowly receding, homophobia that has caused us to maintain the buggery provisions, which, essentially, criminalise male homosexuality and allows the State the role of commissar of sexual preferences and to invade the privacy of people’s bedrooms. It matters nought that the power is little used; its existence is chilling.
(via In Historic Move, Governor Appoints Lesbian Judge To Puerto Rico Supreme Court | The New Civil Rights Movement)

"Democratic Governor Alejandro García Padilla has just appointed Maite Oronoz Rodríguez to the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico. Rodríguez would be the highest-ranking openly-lesbian or openly-gay judge at the state level in the U.S. The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory, and its Supreme Court is equal to any state’s Supreme Court."

(via In Historic Move, Governor Appoints Lesbian Judge To Puerto Rico Supreme Court | The New Civil Rights Movement)

"Democratic Governor Alejandro García Padilla has just appointed Maite Oronoz Rodríguez to the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico. Rodríguez would be the highest-ranking openly-lesbian or openly-gay judge at the state level in the U.S. The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory, and its Supreme Court is equal to any state’s Supreme Court."

Vanier Catholic graduates wear rainbow socks to ceremony

I’m surprised they were able to find than many pairs of rainbow socks in Whitehorse!

Q.

Students show support for gay-straight alliance following last year’s controversy

CBC News Posted: Jun 02, 2014 7:23 PM CT Last Updated: Jun 04, 2014 6:50 PM CT

More than half of the graduating students at Vanier Catholic Secondary School in Whitehorse wore rainbow socks at their cap and gown ceremony this weekend to support their school's gay-straight alliance.

More than half of the graduating students at Vanier Catholic Secondary School in Whitehorse wore rainbow socks at their cap and gown ceremony this weekend to support their school’s gay-straight alliance. (courtesy of Leslie Leong)

More than half of the graduating students at Vanier Catholic Secondary School in Whitehorse wore rainbow socks at their cap and gown ceremony this weekend to support their school’s gay-straight alliance.

The Grade 12 students lived through months of controversy over the Catholic Episcopal Corporation’s policy on homosexuality. The Yukon government ordered the policy removed from the school’s website in March 2013.

Rainbow socks at Vanier school graduation

Graduating students at Vanier Catholic Secondary School enter their cap and gown ceremony wearing rainbow socks. (courtesy of Leslie Leong)

Liam Finnegan, a student at Vanier who is gay, says his friend Kate Power was the organizer of the rainbow socks at Saturday’s ceremony.

"She wanted to make a statement saying ‘We’re not a homophobic school’ because a lot of people have that perception, so it was a really cool experience to see that," he said.

"I remember my dad telling me afterwards how it was an emotional experience, because it showed my class really supporting me, my cause and just being a really open group of people."

About 45 of the 81 students wore rainbow socks.

The Catholic Episcopal Corporation’s policy described homosexuality as “intrinsically disordered” and homosexual acts as a “grave depravity.” The Yukon Department of Education told the school a new policy should offer the same rights as other publicly funded schools and conform to statutes, including human rights legislation.

The school eventually adopted a policy that enabled students to start the Vanier Gay-Straight Alliance. It has about 30 members.​

"It’s a big difference and it’s noticeable," says Finnegan. "Even though it might have just been a few words that changed in the policy, it’s given us the chance to start a wonderful  group that’s trying to make a huge difference in our school and in our community."

He says it was great to see his classmates demonstrating their support at graduation.

Burgess Brothers on Homophobia and Sports (by Bingham Cup Sydney 2014)

"Rugby league stars and brothers Sam and Thomas Burgess encourages you to help end homophobia in sport. Spend 10 min. and take a survey that’s part of the world’s first study on homophobia in sport. www.outonthefields.com

(via World Health Organization: Eliminate Forced Surgery For Transgender People | ThinkProgress)

“Discrimination on the basis of gender identity,” the report offers, has been recognized as a “human rights violation.” It recommends that laws be revised to “remove any requirements for compulsory sterilization of transgender persons.”

(via World Health Organization: Eliminate Forced Surgery For Transgender People | ThinkProgress)

“Discrimination on the basis of gender identity,” the report offers, has been recognized as a “human rights violation.” It recommends that laws be revised to “remove any requirements for compulsory sterilization of transgender persons.”

Thousands march in Cyprus’s first gay pride parade as protesters were held back by police
Scuffles broke out between a group of some 200 Orthodox Christians and the police as they tried to break a police cordon and approach the parade
Photo: Twitter #CyprusPride

Several thousand people turned out for Cyprus’s first gay pride parade in its capital Nicosia on Saturday to call for equal rights and progress on a bill for civil partnership.

Organizers Accept LGBT Cyprus hailed the event as a ‘huge success’ and said that the turnout shows that Cypriots are shedding their conservative views.

After the parade, organisers said on Twitter: ‘Cyprus is changing. Thank you all.’

Incyprus quoted Alecos Modinos, an 81-year old veteran gay activist, as telling the crowd gathered in Nicosia’s Eleftheria (Freedom) Square: ‘I am incredibly moved. A dream of 25 years has come true.’

In the 1990s, Modinos took a case to the European Court of Human Rights which led to the decriminalization of homosexuality in Cyprus in 1998. The anti-gay law is a vestige from the Mediterranean island nation’s British colonial past.

Scuffles broke out between a group of some 200 Orthodox Christian protesters including clerics – who denounced the event they called ‘shameful’ – and the police as they tried to break a police cordon and approach the parade, the Associated Press reported.

The influential Cyprus Orthodox Christian church had earlier condemned the parade and issued a strongly-worded statement saying it considers homosexuality ‘the human being’s fall from grace and an illness and not a natural way of life or choice.’

The gay pride parade is reportedly one of the largest marches seen in Cyprus in several years, and notably bigger than protest gatherings over Cyprus’s tumultuous financial bailout in 2013.

I may be called fat – I am proud of that. I enjoy every ounce on me and every bite of food that made me that way. I may be called old, as I have enjoyed every second of my life. But if you call me ugly, you have only yourself to blame. I am beautiful in every way, and if you cannot see that, I feel sorry for you.

The Whittington Family: Ryland’s Story (by TheWhittingtonFamily)

Parenting, doing it right.

In many areas of the world being gay is still a mutancy which is clearly not tolerated in some societies. You can be put to death for your sexuality. Not in this country. We have advanced – it’s been one of the great joys of my life – since these films have been made.