QBits
I may be called fat – I am proud of that. I enjoy every ounce on me and every bite of food that made me that way. I may be called old, as I have enjoyed every second of my life. But if you call me ugly, you have only yourself to blame. I am beautiful in every way, and if you cannot see that, I feel sorry for you.

The Whittington Family: Ryland’s Story (by TheWhittingtonFamily)

Parenting, doing it right.

In many areas of the world being gay is still a mutancy which is clearly not tolerated in some societies. You can be put to death for your sexuality. Not in this country. We have advanced – it’s been one of the great joys of my life – since these films have been made.
(via US: Gay male student crowned prom queen in Connecticut · PinkNews.co.uk)

"A gay male student at a Connecticut school has been crowned prom queen.

Danbury High School student Nasir Fleming does not identify as transgender, but says he ran for prom queen to “show the world” that anything is possible.”

(via US: Gay male student crowned prom queen in Connecticut · PinkNews.co.uk)

"A gay male student at a Connecticut school has been crowned prom queen.

Danbury High School student Nasir Fleming does not identify as transgender, but says he ran for prom queen to “show the world” that anything is possible.”

'I remember growing up not knowing it was a thing, feeling very confused, feeling very alone,' she said. 'So that is one of the reasons why I came out publicly, to help another struggling 12 year old who is terrified - just to let them know it's okay and that it is very real. Your trials and tribulations are just as real as anybody elses.'

Jamaica’s Underground Gays | Unreported World Shorts | Channel 4 (by Channel 4)

TW:violence,homophobia, transphobia, slurs, abuse

Preview clip of a report on LGBTQ youth forced to live in the storm drains in Jamaica. A link to the full report is below. Be forewarned, neither the clip nor the full report are easy to watch.
Q.

"Krissy is openly gay in a society where 85% of the population think homosexuality is immoral.

Ostracised by her community, Krissy’s home is a storm drain; her water supply, a broken water pipe; and her evenings are regularly spent dodging hurled stones and broken bottles. Why? Because Krissy is openly gay and transgender in a society where 85% of the population think homosexuality is immoral.”


See the full, 1/2 hour report here:

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/unreported-world/4od

Pink Dot 2014 - For Family, For Friends, For Love. (by Pink Dot SG)

This is a very sweet promo for Pink Dot 2014.
Q.

"What does the freedom to love mean to you? LGBT and straight Singaporeans share their sentiments about Pink Dot and their wish for a more open-minded and inclusive Singapore."

Canada: High school banned from flying gay pride flag

The students were told they could not fly the flag

The students were told they could not fly the flag

A High School in the Canadian province of New Brunswick has banned students from flying a gay pride flag during pride week, because of a ban on “non-official flags on public property.”

Students at the Leo Hayes High School, which has flown the rainbow flag for the past two years, were told by Premier David Alward that they could not fly the flag.

In protest, they have begun a petition to the New Brunswick government to change the policy.

The Change.org petition, set up by Tianna Whelan, aims to “allow schools to raise the pride flag because the safety and acceptable of children should be placed at a higher importance than a law that was forgotten about for two years.”

“Flying the pride flag shows students, and the public, that the school is a safe and accepting place for everyone,” the petition continues.

The New Brunswick legislature flew the rainbow flag during the Sochi Olympics to support gay athletes, although some note that it took until the sixth day of the games to raise the flag.

“Government does not move at the fastest pace, that’s for sure,” said cabinet minister Craig Leonard at the time.

“But I think what’s important is that the flag is flying today in solidarity with the LGBT community, and certainly we as a government want to make sure that message is sent loud and clear that we appreciate the LGBT community in this province.”

The Fredericton City Hall is flying the flag, and Friday marks the end of pride week at the Leo Hayes school.

Ugandan gay activists denied visas to World Pride conference

The Harper government in action.

Q.

Renowned Ugandan gay activist Frank Mugisha is the only Ugandan delegate who has a valid visa as the keynote speaker at the World Pride human rights conference in Toronto.

Renowned Ugandan gay activist Frank Mugisha is the only Ugandan delegate who has a valid visa as the keynote speaker at the World Pride human rights conference in Toronto.

Canada has refused to issue visitor visas to 10 Ugandan activists invited to Toronto’s World Pride human rights conference in June over concerns they would stay to seek asylum.

Gay rights advocates say the decisions by the Canadian visa posts in Nairobi and London speak to the hypocrisy of the Stephen Harper government, which, in February, joined other Western nations in condemning Uganda for passing one of the world’s harshest anti-homosexuality laws.

“We are shocked and appalled. These individuals from Uganda are some of the most courageous heroes,” said Andrea Houston of #ENDhatelaws, a coalition founded in response to homophobia/transphobia across the globe, amid the controversy over anti-gay laws passed in Russia prior to the Winter Olympics.

“They are here to share their stories and have every intention to go home after the conference, because they all have work to do in Uganda. The assumption is they are here to claim asylum. The question is: Why can’t they, coming from the most hostile place in the world to LGBTQ people?”

The 10 men and women — all working in precarious conditions to support Uganda’s LGBTQ community — are among 160 speakers and 400 delegates from over 40 countries invited to the June 25-27 conference at the University of Toronto.

Conference co-chair Brenda Cossman said the first visa denial was reported in early April, but concerns grew when other Ugandan invitees all had their applications rejected.

Read More

Homophobic attack on LGBTI rights group widely condemned in Chile
The government, the army and all political parties in Chile have condemned a graffiti attack on the headquarters of LGBTI rights group MOVILH in a sign of growing acceptance in Latin America
Alvaro Elizalde (left)
Photo by Warko

The headquarters of Chilean LGBTI rights group the Movement for Homosexual Integration and Liberation (MOVILH) was defaced with homophobic graffiti on Saturday, sparking an outcry from across Chilean society.

Slogans such as ‘gay AIDS patients’ and ‘death to gays’ were scrawled on the building’s facade and footpath by unknown persons on the same day that 50,000 people marched in support of LGBTI equality in Alameda.

It was the first time in MOVILH’s 23 year history that such an attack was carried out on its headquarters.

‘With great sadness we saw this morning that the sidewalk and the front of our headquarters were completely lined with brutal homophobic phrases,’ the group said in a statement.

‘This clearly demonstrates that the more you advance in rights and equality for sexual diversity, the more homophobes and transphobes act with irrationality and violence against those who have a sexual orientation or gender identity different to the majority.’

The group has lodged a complaint with the police, but the incident has resulted in an outpouring of support for the group.

Chilean Government Minister Alvaro Elizalde paid a personal visit to express the government’s concern over the attack, saying that it showed the need to strengthen Chile’s laws protecting LGBTIs.

‘It is very important to be alert to condemn all forms of hate speech and acts of aggression based on sexual orientation, ethnicity, religious or ideological in the thinking of a particular person - any form of discrimination is acceptable,’ Elizalde said.

‘As a government we can not stand idly by, we can not have a passive role when we see this kind of facts occurs.

‘If you do not condemn such attacks from the beginning, then we have dramatic events as was the Zamudio case and so it is very important that as a society we are alert to condemn any incitement to hatred and acts of aggression.’

Elizalde was referring to the 2012 murder of 24-year-oldgay man Daniel Zamudio which shocked Chilean society into passing its first law protecting people from discrimination and hate crimes on the grounds of sexuality and gender identity amongst other categories.

Elizalde, who is also the Secretary General of the ruling Socialist Party was joined by all other parties in the parliament in condemning the attack.

MOVILH also received support from the Chilean Army and the United Nations.

The army’s head of communications, Colonel Cristobal de la Cerda Rodríguez, wrote to the group to share its support.

‘We share the repudiation of this treacherous attack on your headquarters,’ Rodriguez wrote.

‘[This incident] is a sign that a section of our community has not moved towards the inclusion of all. Hopefully you can overcome this and continue your work as soon as possible.’

The Regional Office for South America of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) also condemned the attack.

‘This attack is of particular concern, given the role played by such organizations as defenders of human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people,’ OCHCR said in a statement.

‘All sectors of society are called to repudiate any act of violence based on sexual orientation and gender identity. It is the duty of the State to thoroughly investigate and punish those responsible for these acts, in order to prevent these forms of violence are reiterated or worsen.

‘The State of Chile has assumed international obligations to respect and guarantee against discrimination on any grounds, including sexual orientation and gender identity. This is essential to promote prevention and generate affirmative action to eradicate the stigma and stereotypes that are the basis of discourses and practices of discrimination and violence against various groups of the population.

‘We reiterate the need to carry out campaigns of public education and information to counter homophobic and transphobic attitudes, and promote the values of diversity and mutual respect. We reiterate to the powers of the State of Chile the need to build a culture of human rights that promotes the value of equality and non-discrimination.’

Zakhele Mbhele
(via EXCLUSIVE: MEET AFRICA’S FIRST OPENLY-GAY BLACK MP - MambaOnline)
“One of the most damaging things about homophobia is its destructive effect on a young LGBT person’s self-esteem. That was certainly one of the issues I grappled with when I was coming to terms with my sexuality in my teen years,” he explained.
“Having more openly gay achievers in society can counter that damage by giving young LGBT people role models to inspire them to build their self-confidence and work ambitiously to achieve their dreams.” — Zakhele Mbhele

Zakhele Mbhele

(via EXCLUSIVE: MEET AFRICA’S FIRST OPENLY-GAY BLACK MP - MambaOnline)

“One of the most damaging things about homophobia is its destructive effect on a young LGBT person’s self-esteem. That was certainly one of the issues I grappled with when I was coming to terms with my sexuality in my teen years,” he explained.

“Having more openly gay achievers in society can counter that damage by giving young LGBT people role models to inspire them to build their self-confidence and work ambitiously to achieve their dreams.” — Zakhele Mbhele

"South Africa has ended its ban on gay men donating blood for six months after they have last had sex which aimed to prevent HIV infected blood from entering the blood supply.

Under new rules announced by the South African National Blood Service gay men who are in monogamous committed relationships will be able to give blood alongside those who have not been sexually active for at least six month.”

Read more at the source link.

The Fight Continues (by HBO)

TW: slurs, scenes of violence.

"Watch a short documentary explaining the events that led up to the AIDS crisis. "The Fight Continues" examines prejudice and homophobia — topics as relevant now as they were in 1981 when the AIDS crisis began in the US. Created by the Director and Executive Producer of the HBO film The Normal Heart, Ryan Murphy."

(via First Lady of Belize calls for end to anti-gay violence | Gay Star News)

‘The universal declaration of human rights gives us all the right to life, liberty and security of person. It speaks of a world that is free and equal,’ she said.

‘And yet, LGBT persons continue to be subjected to terrible violence. They are deprived of their most basic rights, most importantly, the right to security of person because of their sexual orientation and gender identity.

‘Hate crimes and hate speech against the LGBT community continue to rear its ugly head. And we have seen cases in Belize where they have been physically attacked or subjected to insults without provocation.

‘I continue to assert that violence is never justified despite our differences. Just as we fight to end racism and gender inequalities we must also seek to end the practice of bullying others because they are different.

‘No-one deserves to the inhumane treatment that many LGBT person suffer. They are often in fear, not only for their physical safety, but for their lives and that is no way to live.’

Read more at the source link.

(via First Lady of Belize calls for end to anti-gay violence | Gay Star News)

‘The universal declaration of human rights gives us all the right to life, liberty and security of person. It speaks of a world that is free and equal,’ she said.

‘And yet, LGBT persons continue to be subjected to terrible violence. They are deprived of their most basic rights, most importantly, the right to security of person because of their sexual orientation and gender identity.

‘Hate crimes and hate speech against the LGBT community continue to rear its ugly head. And we have seen cases in Belize where they have been physically attacked or subjected to insults without provocation.

‘I continue to assert that violence is never justified despite our differences. Just as we fight to end racism and gender inequalities we must also seek to end the practice of bullying others because they are different.

‘No-one deserves to the inhumane treatment that many LGBT person suffer. They are often in fear, not only for their physical safety, but for their lives and that is no way to live.’

Read more at the source link.

KOGA “Lucky Man” Directed By Emile Hirsch (by TheShakespeare001)

KOGA “Lucky Man” Directed by Emile Hirsch
Starring Ace Norton and Frankie Levangie
Produced and Shot by Matt Smiley
Facebook.com/kogamusic
www.kogamusic.com